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9VAC25-151-290. Sector V - Textile mills, apparel, and other fabric products.

A. Discharges covered under this section. The requirements listed under this section apply to stormwater discharges associated with industrial activity from textile mills, apparel and other fabric product manufacturing, generally described by SIC 22 and 23. This section also covers facilities engaged in manufacturing finished leather and artificial leather products (SIC 31, except 3111). Facilities in this sector are primarily engaged in the following activities: textile mill products, of and regarding facilities and establishments engaged in the preparation of fiber and subsequent manufacturing of yarn, thread, braids, twine, and cordage, the manufacturing of broad woven fabrics, narrow woven fabrics, knit fabrics, and carpets and rugs from yarn; processes involved in the dyeing and finishing of fibers, yarn fabrics, and knit apparel; the integrated manufacturing of knit apparel and other finished articles of yarn; the manufacturing of felt goods (wool), lace goods, nonwoven fabrics, miscellaneous textiles, and other apparel products.

B. Special conditions. Prohibition of nonstormwater discharges. In addition to the general nonstormwater prohibition in Part I B 1, the following discharges are not covered by this permit: discharges of wastewater (e.g., wastewater as a result of wet processing or from any processes relating to the production process); reused or recycled water; and waters used in cooling towers. These discharges must be covered under a separate VPDES permit.

C. Stormwater pollution prevention plan requirements. In addition to the requirements of Part III, the SWPPP shall include, at a minimum, the following items.

1. Site description. Summary of potential pollutant sources. The plan shall include a description of the potential pollutant sources from the following activities: industry-specific significant materials and industrial activities (e.g., backwinding, beaming, bleaching, backing, bonding carbonizing, carding, cut and sew operations, desizing, drawing, dyeing, flocking, fulling, knitting, mercerizing, opening, packing, plying, scouring, slashing, spinning, synthetic-felt processing, textile waste processing, tufting, turning, weaving, web forming, winging, yarn spinning, and yarn texturing).

2. Stormwater controls.

a. Good housekeeping measures.

(1) Material storage areas. All containerized materials (e.g., fuels, petroleum products, solvents, dyes, etc.) shall be clearly labeled and stored in a protected area, away from drains. The permittee shall describe and implement measures that prevent or minimize contamination of stormwater runoff from such storage areas, and shall include a description of the containment area or enclosure for those materials that are stored outdoors. The permittee may consider an inventory control plan to prevent excessive purchasing of potentially hazardous substances. The permittee shall ensure that empty chemical drums and containers are clean (triple-rinsing shall be considered) and residuals are not subject to contact with precipitation or runoff. Washwater from these cleanings shall be collected and disposed of properly.

(2) Material handling area. The permittee shall describe and implement measures that prevent or minimize contamination of the stormwater runoff from materials handling operations and areas. The permittee shall consider the following measures (or their equivalents): use of spill and overflow protection; covering fueling areas; and covering and enclosing areas where the transfer of materials may occur. Where applicable, the plan shall address the replacement or repair of leaking connections, valves, transfer lines and pipes that may carry chemicals, dyes, or wastewater.

(3) Fueling areas. The permittee shall describe and implement measures that prevent or minimize contamination of the stormwater runoff from fueling areas. The permittee shall consider the following measures (or their equivalents): covering the fueling area; using spill and overflow protection; minimizing runon of stormwater to the fueling areas; using dry cleanup methods; and treating or recycling stormwater runoff collected from the fueling area.

(4) Aboveground storage tank areas. The permittee shall describe and implement measures that prevent or minimize contamination of the stormwater runoff from aboveground storage tank areas, including the associated piping and valves. The permittee shall consider the following measures (or their equivalents): regular cleanup of these areas; preparation of a spill prevention control and countermeasure program (SPCC) to provide spill and overflow protection; minimizing runon of stormwater from adjacent areas; restricting access to the area; insertion of filters in adjacent catch basins; absorbent booms in unbermed fueling areas; use of dry cleanup methods; and permanently sealing drains within critical areas that may discharge to a storm drain.

b. Routine facility inspections. Inspections shall be conducted at least monthly, and shall include the following activities and areas (at a minimum): transfer and transmission lines; spill prevention; good housekeeping practices; management of process waste products; all structural and nonstructural management practices. The requirement for routine facility inspections is waived for facilities that have maintained an active VEEP E3/E4 status.

c. Employee training. Employee training shall, at a minimum address, the following areas when applicable to a facility: use of reused or recycled waters; solvents management; proper disposal of dyes; proper disposal of petroleum products and spent lubricants; spill prevention and control; fueling procedures; and general good housekeeping practices.

Statutory Authority

62.1-44.15 of the Code of Virginia; 402 of the federal Clean Water Act; 40 CFR Parts 122, 123, and 124.

Historical Notes

Derived from Virginia Register Volume 15, Issue 9, eff. June 30, 1999; amended, Virginia Register Volume 20, Issue 16, eff. July 1, 2004; Volume 25, Issue 19, eff. June 24, 2009; Volume 30, Issue 11, eff. July 1, 2014.


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